Late Rep. Isaac Robinson remembered on House floor

    The late Isaac Robinson, a member of the state House, was one of the 1,500 photos displayed during the Detroit Memorial to Honor Victims of COVID-19 on Belle Isle in Detroit | Ken Coleman

    In bipartisan fashion, the Michigan House of Representatives on Thursday adopted HR 316, a memorial resolution honoring the late Rep. Isaac Robinson (D-Detroit). He died on March 29 at age 44 and was likely the first state lawmaker in the country to die of COVID-19.

    His father, Roger Robinson, and longtime staff member, Dawn Tucker-Davis, attended the session. In addition, Isaac Robinson’s HB 5120, which will help give thousands of Michigan residents with misdemeanor marijuana convictions a second chance as part of a comprehensive expungement package, was enrolled. 

    State Reps. Sherry Gay-Dagnogo (D-Detroit) and Yousef Rabhi present Roger Robinson, father of the late Rep. Isaac Robinson (D-Detroit), with a commemorative flag and tribute honoring his son’s tireless commitment to the people of Michigan at the Capitol in Lansing on Sept. 24. | Michigan House Democrats

    “Rep. Robinson was as hard-working as he was passionate for his community,” said House Minority Leader Christine Greig (D-Farmington Hills). “His accomplishments serving the city of Detroit are notable, but he will also be remembered for his contagious enthusiasm, infusing everyone around him with determined energy. He was a compassionate man, a devoted public servant and a fierce friend to so many of us. He is greatly missed.”

    Robinson was elected in 2018, succeeding his mother, former state Rep. Rose Mary Robinson (D-Detroit). Before serving in the House, Robinson toiled for a decade working on behalf of organized labor in various roles. During that time, he built a reputation as an advocate for everyone in his community. 

    He served on several committees, including Commerce and Tourism, Regulatory Reform and Tax Policy. Robinson, according to friends and colleagues, was a tireless champion on issues important to the district, especially environmental protection and community safety, auto insurance reform, education, criminal justice and expungement, and civil rights.

    Ken Coleman
    Ken Coleman covers Southeast Michigan, economic justice and civil rights. He is a former Michigan Chronicle senior editor and served as the American Black Journal segment host on Detroit Public Television. He has written and published four books on black life in Detroit, including Soul on Air: Blacks Who Helped to Define Radio in Detroit and Forever Young: A Coleman Reader. His work has been cited by the Detroit News, Detroit Free Press, History Channel and CNN. Additionally, he was an essayist for the award-winning book, Detroit 1967: Origins, Impacts, Legacies. Ken has served as a spokesperson for the Michigan Democratic Party, Detroit Public Schools, U.S. Sen. Gary Peters and U.S. Rep. Brenda Lawrence. Previously to joining the Advance, he worked for the Detroit Federation of Teachers as a communications specialist. He is a Historical Society of Michigan trustee and a Big Brothers Big Sisters of Metropolitan Detroit advisory board member.